Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD)

I was initially frustrated with searching for more information about ADD via the online search engines. Many of the searches came back with ADHD instead. Providentially, I was able to find the site provide by the (US) Cleveland Clinic (Glossary Page, last updated on 27 Jul 2007) which clarified (in some senses) that ADD was a subset of ADHD. People with ADHD display “inattention, distractibility, hyperactivity, and impulsivity” whereas people with ADD is described as: “A label with the same meaning as ADHD. At one time, ADD referred to a disorder involving difficulty paying attention or focusing attention without hyperactivity.”

It can be daunting and confusing (especially if one is a parent of a child showing similar symptoms – think of the emotional flux) conducting research on this topic. The definition of ADHD had been revised ‘many times’ (Shea, p. 5). Further, ADD and ADHD had been considered one and the same at certain junctures (Shea, p. 6). [Again, I highlight and show the need for cross-referencing. This is practiced in History and Social Studies.]

With regards to interventions, one can consider:

  • exercise (one success story raised was Michael Phelps, the Olympic swimmer)
  • organisational aids like smartphone/tablet/electronic organisers (this is similar to sufferers of dyslexia)

These can help affected people better manage the condition.

 

Book reference and notes:

Therese Shea. (2014). ADD and ADHD. New York. The Rosen Publishing Group.

A recent US survey by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) showed that in excess of 5 million children (ages 3 to 17) were diagnosed with ADHD: in other words, 9% of that age group. CDC likewise stated that 4% of US adults suffer from ADHD.

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